Thursday, May 24, 2012

Tutorial On Using My Shibori Fabrics–Part 2

Shiboristepbystep7

I thought I had really resolved this when I created this composition.

After taking a photo and seeing it on the computer it doesn’t work at all.

A lot of beautiful fabrics, but they are not playing well together in a pleasing design.

Back to the design wall.

Shiboridesign3a

I took several steps backward and am almost satisfied with what is happening. This is after 14 other things I tried and photographed.

Each time I look at this I see something else I want to try and change. I am having a problem finding a piece of fabric that works for the upper left area.

I really want to use something from the 200 pieces I dyed rather than dying more fabric.

When I finally resolve this design and sew it together people are going to say “I could do that – such a simple design and just a few pieces of fabric sewn together”.

You and I will know better.

5 comments:

Anonymous said...

This is pleasing to me but I find three green blocks the same size and color a bit litera
If the bottom green were smaller and you filled in with something to balance the singletons, it might open a new path.

Just my reaction,

Helene

Laura said...

I love making shibori fabric after taking a class with Jan Myers Newbury, but have a hard time using it. I've been watching your blog to see how you used yours, but see you struggle with it too! Hopefully we'll both figure it out, the fabric is just too great to keep hidden away in bins. And it's so much fun to make!

Robin said...

Watching your design process is fascinating and very helpful to me as a quilter.

Anonymous said...

very nice, Kay. I think a lot of us have difficulty cutting into fabrics we have spent a lot of time making. I like what you have done so far, but I agree it is not quite there yet---I think there is something more needed for those greeny-purply rectangles. do you have something in those colors that is not shibori?

Mary Stori said...

A very wise observation Kay......often times it's the simplier designs that are the most difficult to achieve since it only takes one patch to be 'off' to negatively affect the entire composition.

I know you'll nail it.....you have the eye for great design and the patience to wait until you get it right!